No More Worries @ The Spring, Havant

What
No More Worries @ The Spring, Havant
When
Thursday, November 19, 2015
7:30pm - All Ages Buy Tickets
Where
The Spring Arts & Heritage Centre
56 East Street


Havant, Hampshire , UK PO9 1BS
Other Info
Tickets: £6
Ever wanted to get away from it all?
Kieran is 27, and stuck in a dead-end seaside town. He wants to see the world, one exotic cocktail at a time. But not tonight, as there’s a gig on at Rileys bar and sambuca’s are half price.
Paul is 50 and on the road again, a laid-back slacker in an old skool campervan. Trusting in tai chi and superstition, he’s on a very odd quest.
Join this mismatched couple on their road-trip through austerity Britain, searching for the perfect holiday moment.
Sometimes the past is the only thing you can’t leave behind.
Artistic collaborators Simon Mole and Peader Kirk return to The Spring after last year’s Indiana Jones and the Extra Chair. They’ll also be taking their special brand of spoken word magic out into the community, running pop-up poetry events you can get involved in and working with local young people on a bespoke schools project. Look out for them at a venue near you!
Co-produced by the Albany, Apples and Snakes and ARC Stockton.

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No More Worries @ Bush Theatre

What
No More Worries @ Bush Theatre
When
Friday, November 13, 2015
7:30pm - All Ages Buy Tickets
Where
7 Uxbridge Road
London, UK W12 8LJ
Other Info
No More Worries
Created by Simon Mole & Peader Kirk
Co-produced by Apples and Snakes, the Albany and ARC Stockton

Ever wanted to get away from it all?

Kieran is 27, and stuck in a dead-end sea-side town. He wants to see the world, one exotic cocktail at a time. But tonight there’s a UK garage revival on at Rileys, and Sambuca’s half price.

Paul is 50 and on the road again, a British Lebowski in an old skool campervan. Trusting in tai chi and the power of sevens, he’s on a quest to reconcile then and now.

Join this mismatched couple on their road-trip through austerity Britain, searching for the perfect holiday moment. Sometimes the past is the only thing you can’t leave behind.

This Is How We Die
by Christopher Brett Bailey

A motor-mouthed collage of spoken word and storytelling. Tales of paranoia, young love and ultra-violence. From the desk of Christopher Brett Bailey comes a spiraling odyssey of pitch-black humour and nightmarish prose.

With echoes of Lenny Bruce, William Burroughs, beat poetry and B-movies, This Is How We Die is a prime slice of surrealist trash, an Americana death trip and a dizzying exorcism for a world convinced it is dying…

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No More Worries @ Beaford Arts

What
No More Worries @ Beaford Arts
When
Thursday, October 22, 2015
TBC - All Ages Buy Tickets
Where
Heywood Hall, (map)
Chulmleigh Community College:
Chulmleigh EX18
Other Info
“Ever wanted to get away from it all? Kieran is 27 and stuck in a dead-end town. He wants to see the world. Foreign suns, adventure, cocktails. Paul is 50 and on the road again, coasting, taking it one holiday snap at a time. No more worries takes this mismatched couple on a road-trip through austerity Britain until the land runs out. Sometimes the past is the only thing you can’t leave behind.”
Combining spoken word, contemporary theatre and a live electronic soundscape, No More Worries reinvigorates performance poetry as its protagonists raise questions we all ask. What do I want to get away from? What will I return to? How do we get by?
“Simon is one of the hottest new talents on the spoken word scene” - Aoife Mannix
“Paints a portrait of England – a real document of this time” - Roger Robinson

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No More Worries @ the Albany

What
No More Worries @ the Albany
When
Thursday, September 24, 2015
7:30pm - All Ages Buy Tickets
Where
Douglas Way
Deptford, London, UK SE8 4AG
Other Info
No More Worries
Created by Simon Mole and Peader Kirk.
Kieran is 27 and stuck in a dead-end town. He wants to see the world: foreign suns, adventure and cocktails. Paul is 50 and on the road again in an old-skool campervan.
Join this mismatched couple on their road-trip through austerity Britain, searching for the perfect holiday moment. Sometimes the past is the only thing you can’t leave behind.
Simon Mole is a poet and an Albany Associate Artist. Peader Kirk is an artist and director. They've collaborated on No More Worries to create a poetic, theatrical adventure spanning the breadth of Britain.

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Indiana Jones & the extra chair @ The Spring, Havant

What
Indiana Jones & the extra chair @ The Spring, Havant
When
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
7:15pm - All Ages Buy Tickets
Where
The Spring Arts & Heritage Centre
56 East Street


Havant, Hampshire , UK PO9 1BS
Other Info
In association with Apples and Snakes and The Spring, Simon Mole presents

Indiana Jones and the Extra Chair
Every family dinner needs a hero.

Mike is twenty-three years old but still asks ‘what would Indy do?’ at times of crisis, and it’s crunch time when we meet him at a busy train station on his way to his Mum’s. His crumbling love-life is colliding with his heroic fantasy world and the consequences move from hilarious to heartbreaking. Join our hero round the table for his toughest adventure yet, meeting his mum’s new boyfriend…

Simon Mole’s ground-breaking one man show comes to Havant, as part of a residency at The Spring. Working with students from Park Community School to bring you an unforgettable evening peppered with memories, rhymes and recipes…

**Booking required, Food Included**

Suitable for ages 12+

“The young poets were brilliant – brought a tear to my eye!”
Audience member, ARC

“One of the most groundbreaking spoken word shows I have seen”
Russell Thompson, Apples & Snakes London Co-ordinator

“Extremely funny, moving and well observed”
Aoife Mannix, poet in residence BBC radio 4 Saturday Live

“Awesome”
Pete Strauss, Huffington Post 4.5 Stars

“A compelling piece of spoken word”
Lettie McKie, Sabotage Reviews

BOOK NOW

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No More Worries mini-film: the pub scene

I blogged a few months back about the spoken word road-trip movie for theatres I’m making with director Peader Kirk. The show is called ‘No More Worries’ and has been co-commissioned by Apples and Snakes and the Albany.

As part of the final project we think we might like to shoot a series of extracts from the full piece in various locations as we tour the theatre performance – mini-films which viewed in sequence would tell the whole story of the show. The aim with this trial one (masterfully filmed and edited by Karim Kamar as part of our Arts Council funded R&D phase) was to get close to the vibe of what it is like seeing me perform the piece live, but mix that up with a few more cinematic flourishes here and there. Hope you enjoy it!

Indiana Jones & the extra chair @ Southbank Centre

What
Indiana Jones & the extra chair @ Southbank Centre
When
Tuesday, October 15, 2013
7:30pm - All Ages Buy Tickets
Where
Belvedere Road


London, UK SE1 8XX
Other Info
Simon Mole's ground-breaking one man show is a spoken word adventure that takes place over the evening meal.

Every family dinner needs a hero. Mike is twenty-three years old but still asks 'what would Indy do?' at times of crisis, and it's crunch time when we meet him at a busy train station on his way to his Mum's.

His crumbling love-life is colliding with his heroic fantasy world and the consequences move from hilarious to heart-breaking. Join our hero round the table for his toughest adventure yet, meeting his mum's new boyfriend.

The show is touring nationally as a residency project throughout 2013. This eye-catching collaboration with critically acclaimed site-specific theatre director Peader Kirk takes spoken word performance in an exciting new direction, with Simon's brilliantly crafted poetic story at the core of a full evening of immersive entertainment.

And you get dinner!

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Indiana Jones & the extra chair @ Southbank Centre

What
Indiana Jones & the extra chair @ Southbank Centre
When
Monday, October 14, 2013
7:30pm - All Ages Buy Tickets
Where
Belvedere Road


London, UK SE1 8XX
Other Info
Simon Mole's ground-breaking one man show is a spoken word adventure that takes place over the evening meal.

Every family dinner needs a hero. Mike is twenty-three years old but still asks 'what would Indy do?' at times of crisis, and it's crunch time when we meet him at a busy train station on his way to his Mum's.

His crumbling love-life is colliding with his heroic fantasy world and the consequences move from hilarious to heart-breaking. Join our hero round the table for his toughest adventure yet, meeting his mum's new boyfriend.

The show is touring nationally as a residency project throughout 2013. This eye-catching collaboration with critically acclaimed site-specific theatre director Peader Kirk takes spoken word performance in an exciting new direction, with Simon's brilliantly crafted poetic story at the core of a full evening of immersive entertainment.

And you get dinner!

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No More Worries – Q&A

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What follows is an informal Q&A conducted for Pistols and Pollinators by Naomi Woddis with myself and Peader Kirk about our process when collaborating on a new longer show ‘No More Worries’. As a bit of background, Peader is an artist and director who creates immersive performance environments where the audience become a part of the work and encounter becomes possible. His work has recently been shown at the ICA, London, The National Theatre of Greece, Athens and the Academy of Fine Arts, Turin. He also directed my first solo show ‘Indiana Jones and the extra chair’…

N: The premise of the show has got me really interested – whose idea was it ? Or was that also a collaborative effort ? Can you tell me a little bit more about it ?
S: it was my idea.
P: 
I think the question of “whose idea” is really difficult to get at, what’s been interesting is that it’s been something that’s been batted back and forth. The initial seed of conception came from Simon, and was passed back and forth to the point that it’s almost impossible now to work out or remember which bit was whose idea, and that’s irrelevant anyway.
S: 
ok, it developed collaboratively – initially through chatting on breaks from rehearsing Indy, which is a totally different show. It was almost a release from the rehearsal process, which helped keep us fresh and creative.
P: 
Wasn’t it Dostoyevski who would work two novels at the same time – one in the morning and one in the afternoon.
S: 
so. a bit more about the show – here’s the copy we used for the scratch:
“Ever wanted to get away from it all? Kieran’s 27 and he’s never been on holiday. Paul’s pushing sixty and looking to pull off his final disappearing act. Sometimes, doing the right thing means you tell no-one, because if you did it would stop being the right thing. ‘No more worries’ is a road-trip to the edge, two strangers in Hawaiian shirts staring out the windscreen at the rain, until the land runs out.”
P:
 but we’re also still playing with the idea that it’s a road trip through austerity Britain too.
S: 
What we found from doing the scratch is that it’s almost about too much at the moment. I guess one thing about an ideas based process is that having a good idea is one thing, but then when you have to make them do stuff, actually get up and come to life there’s less room. So we had a lot of exciting chats linking many themes and threads in mind-blowing ways but/
P: 
ideas don’t perform.
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N: Why did you decide to change the way you worked together? how did the process work and who did what when especially when the boundaries of performer and director are blurred ?
P: we didn’t change the way we worked together, it evolved.
S: I think we’d had the plan to devise this show more than me writing it and then being directed to perform it, which was our process before, but maybe the idea of you performing in it too was something that happened more naturally.
P: i have no idea what point i agreed to it. But someone did ask for my acting CV at the scratch.
S: yeah. That didn’t happen for me. It was kind of mad showing some spoken word story telling stuff, which I’m much more comfortable with and more known for, and then also some other stuff that really pushed the idea of what spoken word can be within theatre.
P:  its a difficult thing as artist – people always want you to do your thing, while you want to find a new thing. We’d already made one show that was successful in one way. We wanted to keep that partnership that worked, but discover what else was possible with it.
S: It felt like one show of me talking to myself was enough for now. Also, its knowing that while that show is something I’m really proud of, I’m not really a character performer
P: i think you’re a great character performer. It doesn’t mean you’re acting a character, but you are a great character performer. For me it’s more that there’s a certain dynamic bounce that you can’t get delivering lines to yourself and us wanting to explore that.
S: and wanting to honour the full dramatic potential of the story idea, and really bring it to life in a different way to how we had before, not to be restricted by knowing that two people talking in a scene would actually only be me.
P: and a bit like the American writers room model in that they start to act out bits roughly as writing , we did that and then somehow that bled into being those characters consistently in the show and ended up with the director being a performer in the piece…

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N: What were the advantages and what were the challenges of how you worked this time round ?
S: Peader, you having a role in the writing process was great in terms of sounding board and ideas and sometimes crystallising what would have been a 2 hr write around something down to a 20 minute chat which left me much clearer around what I wanted to write. Conversely it did make it harder in some ways because I felt a bit like stuff had to be signed off, similarly for you directing I guess, in that I had a say in certain elements I might not have done before.
P: collaboration is like co-habitation, you have to learn to live together
S: and i think that learning takes space and time within a process, some days it was just flying along because we could throw ideas back and forth. I think another challenge of writing collaboratively was that we didn’t have as much time to look at performance
P: My mind naturally sees structure and even when i’m inside it I can still sense that structure for an audience but it’s really hard to tweak it from within it, to find that flow and shape that i would if I was just the director. Again just a time thing but would have been great to video every rehearsal to get around that – in a way though the process was building the piece this time…
S: and knowing there would be another phase of development in which we could work on performance. Which did though leave us out of our comfort zones for the scratch
P: yeah. But that’s a good thing
S: and i think we learnt more because of that. It was a scary experience in some ways, but made a lot of things clearer much quicker than would have happened otherwise.
P: if you’re going to show something in progress, then you have to be risking something – if you’re totally sure in the material why are you sharing it in that format? No point bungee jumping off a chair.
S: no. Not to mention that would probably really hurt. Ha ha! Sorry to end on a cheap joke. Thanks for asking the questions Naomi!

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Chill Pill Christmas special at Deptford Market…

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Deptford market it an amazing place with an authentically local feel about it that is too often missing at more trendy boutique style markets. This is a real place for real people. Also, you can get anything you want. Anything. And almost always at a wildly reasonable price. One stallholder told me he had been working there for 32 years and the man’s patter was so on point I could believe he was three decades deep in the game.

“if you can’t see what you’re looking for, just ask. I’m looking for your money, and so far I can’t see it”

A recent addition to the market has been young marketers, trainee traders if you like, supported by a council development programme. On the Saturday we were there (9th December) the young traders were housed in a little market on the square. As part of the overall aim of the project to bring more people to the market (crucially in a way that supports what is already there) Chill Pill were invited to collaborate with site specific theatre director Peader Kirk in order to provide some Christmas entertainment. We thought that the best way to do this would be to fit in with the existing market, and see what happened if we tried to run a stall ourselves! As you can see it was decorated ‘tastefully’, although we did have a few people enquiring after the trees rather than our poems…

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On arrival we got chatting to the young traders; about their wares, what inspired them to get started, their creative processes, business so far etc – The four of us chill pill poets (me, Raymond Antrobus, Deanna Rodger, and Adam Kammerling) then wrote little ‘instant’ poems about each stall-holder individually, before belting these out with a few of our own pieces over the PA. The marketers were really happy to have their stalls written about and promoted in this unusual way, as for young newcomers vocally attracting custom can be a daunting thing to go about.

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Apart from these sporadic performances over the PA (at which we also read some of our favourite ‘seasonal’ poems by other authors) we also tried to bring a bit of poetry to those stall holders and bargain hunters who weren’t naturally passing our way. Our strategy was two fold:

  1. Wandering with ‘the poetry stocking’, from which people could pull titles of Christmas poems, which we would then read to them. Check out Adam doing his thing below. These guys offered us a quid when we were done. Despite us reading them a pretty bleak (although brilliant) poem called ‘snow’ by Vladimir Holan
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  3. Chatting to stallholders and punters, and asking for their own Christmas moments or memories, or alternatively their wishes for themselves or others for this years festivities. We noted these contributions down on Christmas labels and hung them from our trees, before Ray compiled a beautiful little crowd sourced Christmas poem from the results.

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The final service we offered was an idea I pinched from Poetry Takeaway which I saw at Latitiude – where people could come up and ask to have a poem written for them, about anything they wanted – again the turn around for these was mega quick but this video of Adam reading his to the young woman who requested is evidence of what can be achieved in five minutes!

All in all it was a cracking day, and definitely considering trying to get a plot for another stall in the future! Below you will find the text for my pieces for the marketers… Enjoy!

Dr. Denim
A battered leather suitcase
Full of old jeans, but
Everything is in here
Un-pick and re-stitch
Zips, hems, pockets
Make ties, bags, wallets
Make anything you want
Made to order, man’s on it.
Dr. Denim, if you’re passing the stall
Pop your head in, certified swag
What d’you reckon?!

 

Niamh’s preserves
Niamh went from jewellery to jam.
24 carat cake jam.
sticky fingers in the workshop,
berry red splatters on the worktop
roasted red pepper and peach,
each deep flavour worked on and brought through…
Compliment your cheese with a chutney,
have it with a brie or a cheese that’s more crumbly
Perfect for a feed if you’re hungry
Deep in the fridge late night with the munchies
Branstons? What?!
Yeah that’s a brand that you’ve seen and heard
And so it may seem absurd,
but you’re much better off with one of Niamh’s preserves!